Tag Archives: Blindspot

Blindspot: Rain Man (1988)

Back to the days when Tom Cruise hasn’t been that top-billed “film star”, he was once an actor when portraying Charlie Babbitt, a selfish chap who, upon learning about his estranged father’s death, finds out that he has a long-lost brother. Thing is, his way older brother, Raymond (Dustin Hoffman) is an autistic savant, who inherits most of their father’s wealth. There’s pure quality in young Cruise to encounter Hoffman, the powerhouse who went and brought home Best Actor prize in Oscars completing the film’s triumph (with Best Director, Best Original Screenplay and Best Picture victory).

Rain Man follows one of the most narrative about character development with myriads of jolts and sensitivity. A story about a man reconciles and, later, reconnects with his only family member is never an innovation; but, what if the whole story isn’t about the changing man, but the unchanged man instead? That’s where Rain Man makes differences. As much as it tells stories about Charlie’s effort ‘to reconnect’, it was never a story about him; it’s the story of Raymond. Continue reading Blindspot: Rain Man (1988)

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Blindspot: Unforgiven (1992)

“I’ve killed women and children. I’ve killed just about everything that walks or crawled at one time or another,” said William Munny explaining who he was.

Clint Eastwood dedicated his final Western film as a director and an actor, Unforgiven,  to the sub-genre that has made great name out of him. More, he specifically dedicated it to people whom he’ll be forever in debt with, Sergio Leone and Don Siegel. And, who knows that a devoted tribute would end up being a milestone to the modern-day Western film. And, who knows that this tribute would be Eastwood’s legacy. Continue reading Blindspot: Unforgiven (1992)

BLINDSPOT: The English Patient (1996)

“Every night I cut out my heart. But in the morning it was full again,” said Count Almásy.

In the 69th Academy Awards, Anthony Minghella’s The English Patient garnered 12 nominations and won 9 of them including Best Picture and Best Director, hence this post. Minghella’s tour de force practically owns it all and is praised as the film of the year in the same year as Fargo, Jerry Maguire,Shine et al. Clocking in at 162 minutes (as it was initially reportedly to have a 250-minute cut), this epic story is clearly ambitious and tough to watch for its lengthy duration; but, it really is worth the duration. Continue reading BLINDSPOT: The English Patient (1996)

Blindspot: Chicago (2002)

“C’mon, Babe, why don’t we paint the town… and all that Jazz!” Velma Kelly sings on the stage.

In the 75th Academy Awards, Rob Marshall’s Chicago triumphed over with six winnings, including Best Picture, overpowering strong contenders like The Pianist, Gangs of New York, and Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers. Chicago becomes the second musical to win Best Picture after 1968’s Oliver!; and together with Moulin Rouge, it is responsible for the reemergence of musical film in modern days. Continue reading Blindspot: Chicago (2002)

Announcing The Blind Spot Series 2017 Participation

After failing to complete Blind Spot Series 2015 and missing the whole challenge in 2016, Sinekdoks returns for Blind Spot Series 2017 hosted by Ryan McNeill of The Matinee. The idea is: picking 12 films to watch; one film each month for the course of a year. However, it is not merely a shame-list or to-watch list; there must be a sense of purpose to arrange the list.

As for 2017, I dedicate this year’s series as a homage to several Oscars’ Best Pictures I missed from the beyond the 2010s, which I can get the access to watch. I am gonna watch the films in reverse-chronological order to signify the flashback (except for two titles I cannot watch in backwards). Continue reading Announcing The Blind Spot Series 2017 Participation

BLINDSPOT: The Game (1997)

They just fuck you and they fuck you and they fuck you, and then just when you think it’s all over, that’s when the real fucking starts!” said Conrad to his brother.

Speaking of The Game, we might as well speak about how it becomes David Fincher’s less-remembered work. People remember the twist, but barely remember that it’s Fincher’s work. In fact, The Game has all Fincher-ian elements plus twist.

People always make comparisons between this and Fincher’s earlier work Se7en for its tone and uneasy atmosphere. For me, who watched the feats separately (without chronological back-story), they are completely two different entities. Continue reading BLINDSPOT: The Game (1997)