Tag Archives: Fantasy

Beauty and the Beast (2017) – Review

Review: I once wrote an abridged history of Beauty and the Beast roots on my review of Christophe Gans’ La Belle et La Bête. How this beautiful French lore has evolved, added more insight and backstories, and represented social issues from time to time alone has already made an intriguing tale. While adaptations and re-imaginings have altered it from the root, there’s one thing that never fades: the magic.

I can’t still see ‘the whys’ of Disney’s decision to remake their Renaissance animation with a live-action feature; yet, I can put aside that concerns. They’ve done it well with Cinderella (2014) by having courage and being kind and staying true to its root; and The Jungle Book (2016) by fulfilling the bare necessities. And for Beauty and the Beast, I can say that this live-action re-telling is not a must, but it’s necessary. Continue reading Beauty and the Beast (2017) – Review

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Kong: Skull Island (2017) – Review

Review: Among the most ancient colossal monsters in Western cinemas, Kong is possibly one of the most formidable. Almost always plotted out as an antihero, the giant ape has swung across films and media from 1933, most notably in King Kong (1933) and Peter Jackson’s remake in 2005. Its recent incarnation in Kong: Skull Island, however, is the biggest of all; and it’s made that way for one reason: Legendary Entertainment’s MonsterVerse – a world full of monsters, a clash of kaiju, Destroy All Monster v2.0.

Once human’s technology has advanced in the brink of Vietnam War in 1976, a mysterious island is discovered near Pacific. The island – Skull Island – immediately attracts a Monarch researcher, Will Randa (John Goodman); and as soon as there’s a possibility to reach the island, he assembles an expedition team – consisting of post-Vietnam U.S. army led by Lt. Col. Packard (Samuel L. Jackson), a group of scientists with San Lin (Jing Tian) and Brooks (Corey Hawkins) upfront, a photographer, Mason Weaver (Brie Larson) and a mercenary, James Conrad (Tom Hiddleston). Continue reading Kong: Skull Island (2017) – Review

150 Favorite Moments & Easter Eggs in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016)

Not A Review: The first Star Wars spin-off finally boards. Rogue One: A Star Wars Story is a piece of puzzle to connect timeline in the main canon of the saga. Set in between Episode III: Revenge of the Sith and Episode IV: A New HopeRogue One tells a heroic mission carried by the titular squad in stealing Death Star’s plan as told in A New Hope‘s opening crawl.

Though it is a spin-off, Rogue One is still all about the hype. It’s a fan-service spin-off all fanboys and fangirls are waiting for. How it connect story to enrich the main saga is incredible; and the list of references it displayed gets all the fanboys and fangirls scream in excitement. In short, Rogue One is still a certified Star Wars film in and through.

Same as The Force Awakenin 2015, SINEKDOKS isn’t writing a review for Rogue One (although it comes under ‘Movie Review’ category). It’s an appreciation post dedicated to the first official spin-off of Star Wars. SINEKDOKS find 150 favorite moments in the film to share with fellow fans and audiences

P.S.:
– This post is a very long post.
– This post contains soft and hard spoilers for Episode IV: A New Hope, Episode V: Empire Strikes Back, Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, Episode VII: The Force Awakens and Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. Read at your own risk. Continue reading 150 Favorite Moments & Easter Eggs in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016)

Your Name / 君の名は。/ Kimi no na wa (2016) – Review

Review: The “Makoto Shinkai is the new Hayao Miyazaki” buzz embarks again when his latest feature, Kimi no na wa, or as known as Your Name storms Japanese box office recently. Shinkai (5 Centimeters per Second, Children who Chase Lost Voices, The Garden of Words) is always known for his penchant in crafting picturesque, hyperrealistic 2D animation with heart-wrenching story and viable imagination, which transcends in his natural approach.

Shinkai’s works often radiate idyll from the inside, simultaneously emanate visceral, candid narrative. Kimi no na wa / Your Name is no different; only you might bet that it comes from Shinkai’s wildest dream, rather than from his sober contemplation. It might initially look like a usual gender-swapping drama, but as it goes, it unravels more: from time-travel to disaster-drama and quest for love.  Continue reading Your Name / 君の名は。/ Kimi no na wa (2016) – Review

Moana (2016) – Review

Review: Sailing over idyllic seas with tropical islands as background, our self-proclaimed non-princess Disney Princess is going out of her comfort zone fulfilling her lifetime obsession and, most importantly, saving her world from famine. She is Moana—daughter of a Polynesian chieftain—who voyages to the wilderness to find a demigod Maui and restore what-so-called diamond of Te Fiti back for a quest of a lifetime.

In short, Moana manifests Disney’s commitment into stripping off their Disney princesses’ stereotype. The ‘princess’ character is versatile; she even embodies the ‘sense of empowerment’, shooing away the sexism commentary about prince-charming-centered characters from the golden era. Moana is not an interpersonal love story; it’s more than that; and it’s what makes it unravel a completely new era for Disney. Continue reading Moana (2016) – Review

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2016) – Review

Review: Expanded from an encyclopaedia of the same title and penned to screenplay by the only J.K. Rowling, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them is surprisingly a fun ride to American non-pretentious wizard world, which goes much more muggle-friendly than its British counterparts in Harry Potter series.

Set in the same universe in which Harry Potter saga takes places, Fantastic Beasts goes further behind in time as it sets in 1926, decades prior to the British counterpart. At the same time, it also goes across the ocean from London to New York in America, where the adventure of Englishman named Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne) straightforwardly begins. While the spin-off might present some nods to the most famous wizarding world nowadays; it never feels nostalgic nor formulaic because what’s presented here is an original tale, which enriches the existing universe with more than just trivia. Continue reading Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2016) – Review