Tag Archives: Horror

Rings (2017) – Review

Review: When Julia (Matilda Lutz) finds out that her boyfriend (Alex Roe) gets involved in the cycle of “killing videotape” of Samara Morgan from The Ring (2002), she willingly sacrifices herself by watching a copy of the videotape. While waiting for seven-day trial to end, she begins receiving strange metaphysical messages from the behind-the-video entity, which apparently has a hidden agenda for her.

The most obvious problem of Rings is: it attempts to reenact what the first Western Ring excels in. It questionably copies the repetitive cycle and add some superfluous backstory. Viewers of The Ring and sequel have already been too familiar – in other words, fed up – about it; and new viewers will find it worn-off in only 15 minutes in. Yet, what’s most problematic of it all is: it’s not scary at all. Continue reading Rings (2017) – Review

Advertisements

Split (2017) – Review

Review: Split might not be M. Night Shyalaman’s best treat; but it definitely marks the return of this slick storyteller to his powerhouse realm. In fact, Split is different from Shyalaman’s earlier works due to the absence of an actual, grandiose twist ending; but who needs a twist if the whole film has twisted narrative?

It kicks off like any abduction film, where a nerdy man named Dennis (James McAvoy, a powerhouse version of himself), who has OCD, kidnaps three teenage girls and locks them up in a windowless room. Dennis is living with Patricia, a very neat lady, and Hedwig, a 9-year old lisp boy who loves Kanye West. Yet, sometimes, a fashion-designer wanna-be, Barry, takes over; and, some other time, a history-enthusiast, Orwell, might be there too; also, a diabetic, Jade, might as well be there.

Yet, who knows that Dennis or Patricia or Hedwig or Barry or Orwell or Jade or any other alters is living in the same body? Yes, they’re living inside Kevin, a troubled man with acute dissociative identity disorder, who has 23 personalities living inside him, waiting to take over the spotlight.

Continue reading Split (2017) – Review

Resident Evil: The Final Chapter (2017) – Review

Review: The sixth installment of Resident Evil franchise opens with a recaps of ‘the story so far’ narrated by the protagonist, Umbrella’s prodigal daughter, Alice (Milla Jovovich). Going further to several years prior to the first film, the prologue jumps to the event in the first film, and abruptly shifts to several minutes before this Final Chapter.

At one point it’s a courtesy to help audiences refresh and brush up some worn-off memories about the plot of the whole franchise. At the same time, it confirms that, except for the first installment, Resident Evil is rather prolonged, characterless, and forgettable. The Final Chapter has the potentials to wipe that gripe off, to make a lasting final impression; but, the same thing that weighed down its predecessors weighs it down, too. Continue reading Resident Evil: The Final Chapter (2017) – Review

Under the Shadow (2016) – Review

Review: “They travel on the wind, moving from place to place until they find someone to possess.” Let’s agree that the quote isn’t specifically describing a nature of some entities. Make it as if the quote, being stripped off its intrinsic connection, is an allusion of ‘horror’ in general; it might appear in any form, any place and to any people, just like ‘travelling on the wind.’ Be it that way, Babak Anvari’s British-Qatar-Jordan funded horror, Under the Shadow,  is understandably frightening even from the subtitle precedes the whole picture.

Taking place in Tehran, Iran during the decade-long Iran-Iraq war in circa 1988, the horror in Under the Shadow is polymorphic. Nightmare comes along the missile war and the casualty, but it’s not the only form. The “other forms” are far more harrowing and suffocating; but, is Under the Shadow a simple juxtaposition of war and ghost story? Continue reading Under the Shadow (2016) – Review

The Neon Demon (2016) – Review

Review: “Beauty isn’t everything. It’s the only thing,” one character illustrates in the midst of Nicolas Winding Refn’s The Neon Demon to justify the core theme of this neo-surreal piece. Believe me, that quote alone has multi-interpretation; and at some points, it’s an honest confession and excuse to sustain the whole film.

The Neon Demon is a beauty; and beauty isn’t everything. It’s the only thing… the only things the film attempts to convey with faux aesthetic and complexity. Or was it all deliberate? To ensure that the film is a metaphor in its entirety. Continue reading The Neon Demon (2016) – Review

The Girl with All the Gifts (2016) – Review

Review: There’s a well-known paradox known as Schrödinger Cat, a thought experiment in which a cat is put into a box with a toxic acid that may kill it. While inside the box, without observer, the cat is said to be simultaneously alive and dead. One character in The Girl with All the Gifts mentions about the paradox, while simultaneously posts a most appropriate allegory for this film.

The best way to plunge into The Girl with All the Gifts is knowing less beforehand. Not that it is full of surprises and twists, but the adaptation of Mike Carey’s bestselling novel relies much on its first act which serves as a mind-boggling sci-fi mystery with minimum clue available. The less you know about what this film is about, the more this part crawls along your skin with dozens of question marks. Continue reading The Girl with All the Gifts (2016) – Review