Tag Archives: Horror

Life (2017) – Review

Review: The first thing Life has successfully proven is: space horror is still helluva sub-genre. While most space-themed films recently focus on breaking more grounds with cerebral sci-fi euphoria, Daniel Espinosa’s latest feature confidently takes a retro influence to remind us of that notion.

Life opens with approx. 7-minute continuous shot (that suddenly reminds me to Gravity’s opening) revolving around the space-life of 6 crew members of ISS, who at one night make the greatest breakthrough in humanity’s space voyage history: an organic evidence of extraterrestrial form in Mars. The alien being, at first, seems hazardless as a single-cell form; but, then some conditionings ‘awake’ the creature – dubbed as Calvin – to its incredible form: all cells are muscular, neural and photoreceptive – or simply, all cells are muscle, brain, and eyes at once. While the whole world is awe-struck, a noob-mistake in the space station lab triggers a butterfly effect that leads to what I’ve mentioned previously: space horror. Continue reading Life (2017) – Review

Advertisements

A Season with: Santa Clarita Diet (2017) – Season 1

Review: Netflix drops another binge-watch-worthy Drew Barrymore-starred sitcom, Santa Clarita Diet, a while ago. The premise is kinda offbeat: mixing “zombie” story with family sitcom set in a Californian town with ‘diet’ in the title. One thing to keep in mind is: it is not your kind of diet.

If you’re thinking of zom-bombastic actioners like The Walking Dead or gory-zombie bonanzas, you’d better save your thought. You won’t find no ‘real zombie’ in this 10-episode half-hour series. What you will find is a couple of married realtors (Drew Barrymore and Timothy Olyphant), who after a gut-spilling accident in the first episode, must deal with the fact that Sheila – the wife – is undergoing her turning into an undead. Continue reading A Season with: Santa Clarita Diet (2017) – Season 1

Rings (2017) – Review

Review: When Julia (Matilda Lutz) finds out that her boyfriend (Alex Roe) gets involved in the cycle of “killing videotape” of Samara Morgan from The Ring (2002), she willingly sacrifices herself by watching a copy of the videotape. While waiting for seven-day trial to end, she begins receiving strange metaphysical messages from the behind-the-video entity, which apparently has a hidden agenda for her.

The most obvious problem of Rings is: it attempts to reenact what the first Western Ring excels in. It questionably copies the repetitive cycle and add some superfluous backstory. Viewers of The Ring and sequel have already been too familiar – in other words, fed up – about it; and new viewers will find it worn-off in only 15 minutes in. Yet, what’s most problematic of it all is: it’s not scary at all. Continue reading Rings (2017) – Review

Split (2017) – Review

Review: Split might not be M. Night Shyalaman’s best treat; but it definitely marks the return of this slick storyteller to his powerhouse realm. In fact, Split is different from Shyalaman’s earlier works due to the absence of an actual, grandiose twist ending; but who needs a twist if the whole film has twisted narrative?

It kicks off like any abduction film, where a nerdy man named Dennis (James McAvoy, a powerhouse version of himself), who has OCD, kidnaps three teenage girls and locks them up in a windowless room. Dennis is living with Patricia, a very neat lady, and Hedwig, a 9-year old lisp boy who loves Kanye West. Yet, sometimes, a fashion-designer wanna-be, Barry, takes over; and, some other time, a history-enthusiast, Orwell, might be there too; also, a diabetic, Jade, might as well be there.

Yet, who knows that Dennis or Patricia or Hedwig or Barry or Orwell or Jade or any other alters is living in the same body? Yes, they’re living inside Kevin, a troubled man with acute dissociative identity disorder, who has 23 personalities living inside him, waiting to take over the spotlight.

Continue reading Split (2017) – Review

Resident Evil: The Final Chapter (2017) – Review

Review: The sixth installment of Resident Evil franchise opens with a recaps of ‘the story so far’ narrated by the protagonist, Umbrella’s prodigal daughter, Alice (Milla Jovovich). Going further to several years prior to the first film, the prologue jumps to the event in the first film, and abruptly shifts to several minutes before this Final Chapter.

At one point it’s a courtesy to help audiences refresh and brush up some worn-off memories about the plot of the whole franchise. At the same time, it confirms that, except for the first installment, Resident Evil is rather prolonged, characterless, and forgettable. The Final Chapter has the potentials to wipe that gripe off, to make a lasting final impression; but, the same thing that weighed down its predecessors weighs it down, too. Continue reading Resident Evil: The Final Chapter (2017) – Review

Under the Shadow (2016) – Review

Review: “They travel on the wind, moving from place to place until they find someone to possess.” Let’s agree that the quote isn’t specifically describing a nature of some entities. Make it as if the quote, being stripped off its intrinsic connection, is an allusion of ‘horror’ in general; it might appear in any form, any place and to any people, just like ‘travelling on the wind.’ Be it that way, Babak Anvari’s British-Qatar-Jordan funded horror, Under the Shadow,  is understandably frightening even from the subtitle precedes the whole picture.

Taking place in Tehran, Iran during the decade-long Iran-Iraq war in circa 1988, the horror in Under the Shadow is polymorphic. Nightmare comes along the missile war and the casualty, but it’s not the only form. The “other forms” are far more harrowing and suffocating; but, is Under the Shadow a simple juxtaposition of war and ghost story? Continue reading Under the Shadow (2016) – Review