Tag Archives: Horror

Jailangkung (2017): Embodiment of style-over-substance horror

Review: Rizal Mantovani & Jose Purnomo’s sleeper hit Jelangkung (2001) was an integral part of Indonesian film resurrection. This harrowing story—about ancient ritual of summoning spirit using wooden avatar called ‘jelangkung’—was highly phenomenal that it spawned two sequels and cleared the path for other Indonesian ghouls to silver screen.

Sixteen years later, the winning team, Mantovani & Purnomo, is reunited with their winning formula into making a reboot titled Jailangkung. While their 2001 hit is a lo-fi production, this one is completely the opposite. With new target audiences, Jailangkung repackages itself with younger and fresher look; but, was it worth the scare? Continue reading Jailangkung (2017): Embodiment of style-over-substance horror

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47 Meters Down (2017) – Review

Review: Johannes Roberts (The Other Side of the Door) uses his penchant to horror to create sharky open-water terror with a premise similar to Jaume Collett-Serra’s last summer cheap thrills The Shallows—involving deeper shallow-beach, more beautiful girls, and more sharks. Set in an exotic Mexican shore, 47 Meters Down sends Mandy Moore and Claire Holt straight to the hungry sharks in, as the title might suggest, 47 meters below the sea surface.

In 47 Meters Down, Kate (Holt), who has just found out that her sister, Lisa (Moore), ditched by her long-time boyfriend before their Mexican getaway, is at full earnestness to orchestrate an unforgettable vacation for her broken sister. Invited by two locals to cage-diving in shark-infested water, the more YOLO-induced Kate successfully persuades the more reluctant Lisa. What seems to be a larger-than-life excitement suddenly becomes a life-threatening moment for the girls when the crane falls, sending them into the bed of the ocean, with only limited oxygen to survive. Continue reading 47 Meters Down (2017) – Review

Alien: Covenant (2017) – Review

Review: Intriguing how Alien: Covenant opens with a birth, a genesis, in a majestic all-white background contrasts with the franchise’ primal return to its origin. That birth accompanied by Wagner’s Entry of The Gods Into Valhalla is designed to bridge over two worlds – the stark, horror space of Ridley Scott’s Alien (1979) and the odd, philosophy-heavy world of Prometheus (2012) – and continue the cycle. Of gods and men, of gods and monsters, this bleak covenant is more a continuation than a return.

For the flight of Covenant, Mr. Scott amalgamates small dose of Alien’s infernal, frigid space horror with larger dose of Prometheus’ dialogue-laden, existentialism wisdom unevenly, but perfectly, to ignite nostalgia, while at the same time, connect dots. Continue reading Alien: Covenant (2017) – Review

Danur (2017): Different route from Sarasvati’s Danur

Review: Danur, a book by singer, Risa Sarasvati (former Homogenic), about her psychic experience, is actually a sympathetic friendship tale about a girl and her ghost friends. I’ve listened to her album since 2010 and watched Sarasvati’s live performance where she told ghost stories about her songs; therefore, I knew how sympathetic the story is, despite being cliché-laden and light. It is never a horror story, yet, a story about companionship through and through, with some ghosts inside.

However, Awi Suryadi’s Danur, despite adapting Sarasvati’s book, takes a completely different route in presenting the story. Under Awi’s direction, Danur becomes a straight Insidious-esque horror story with major elements from the book stay intact. In fact, it’s a PG-friendly horror, which estranges it from the essence of Risa’s story. Continue reading Danur (2017): Different route from Sarasvati’s Danur

Get Out (2017) – Review

Review: Jordan Peele’s directorial debut Get Out is truly a cinematic experience. How wouldn’t? It’s a witty satirical pitch-black comedy about racism served in horror or thriller mantle (depends on how you would perceive it). Furthermore, it feels mysteriously uncomfortable as it sneaks behind and takes you by surprise at every possible turn. To call it one of the most noteworthy films of the year isn’t exaggerating at all.

Before discussing further, I wouldn’t suggest you watching any trailers or reading careless synopsis; therefore, I am writing this spoiler-free review as careful and neatly as possible. Continue reading Get Out (2017) – Review

The Devil’s Candy (2017) – Review

Review: A fatherly painter, Jesse Hellman (Ethan Embry), who happens to be a death metal aficionado, moves to a bigger, new house along with his wife, Astrid (Shiri Appleby) and his ‘daddy’s little wanna-be’ daughter, Zooey (Kiara Glasco). With beard like Jesus and skinny, tattooed body – almost always naked or wrapped with either Metallica or Slayer tees, Jesse is instantly possessed by an unseen power which makes him paint a satanic figure devours suffering children.

On the opposite end, an overweight, mentally disturbed man, Ray Smile (Pruitt Taylor Vince), who almost always wears red tracking suit, is plagued by the satanic voice. Pleasing his lord/taunting Jesus with full-amped distortion from his Gibson Flying V is one thing that the voice told him to; his main goal is: killing children because they are the devil’s candy. Continue reading The Devil’s Candy (2017) – Review