Tag Archives: Rating: 3.5

Wind River (2017) – Review

Review: In Wind River, Taylor Sheridan again demonstrates a prowess he once showcased on writing tenure for Sicario and Hell or High Water. His painstaking flair for slick and immaculate script—with penchant to coherence and symmetrical storyline—is utterly exquisite. With Sheridan running for both writing and directing gigs, we finally get to see his full-creative-control mode; and, lucky you, it’s taut and clever as you might imagine.

The title refers to a snow-covered Native American reservation in Wyoming, which becomes the setting of this film. It’s the place where a hunter, Cory Lambert (Jeremy Renner), resides. As he tracks a wild mountain lion who preys on local cattles, the all-white-camouflaged hunter accidentally finds a local girl’s body… dead and stark. For the case, FBI sends rookie Jane Banner (Elizabeth Olsen), who immediately team up with Lambert to investigate it.

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The Big Sick (2017) – Review

Review: Love is a many-splendored thing again in The Big Sick, a highly relatable rom-com about multi-cultural relationship inspired by real-life story of its writers—Pakistani-American comedian, Kumail Nanjiani (Silicon Valley), and his wife, Emily V. Gordon.

This Judd Apatow-produced delight package grounds closely to reality and is utterly apprehensible in presenting a witty, sweet story. Some of the aspects are more digestible (also debatable) for people of Eastern culture than those of Western; but it’s never alienating. After all, this is a warm and honest cross-culture romance that attempts to bridge the differences. In short, it’s the kind of old loving-you-loving-your-family love story, which works in the heart of ‘modernity.’

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Bad Genius (2017) – Review

Review: In Bad Genius, director Nattawut Poonpiriya (who previously helmed Countdown, a peculiar New York-set home invasion thriller) crafts an extraordinary story about cheaters in standardized test presented like a heist thriller. Additionally, it either criticizes or mocks, or even actually makes fun of academic exams in a most exhilarating way.

With clever straightforward script and cinematic aptitude to treat class-room multiple choice tests like Ocean’s Eleven, this film successfully deliver a scandalous guilty pleasure the size of The Talented Mr. Ripley.  The result is a super entertaining heist-formulated class room thriller, which scores high and graduate a cumlaude.

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War for the Planet of the Apes (2017) – Review

Review: Let’s start with a little excerpt of what has gone so far in Planet of the Apes reboot universe. As you might have known (in fact, you’ll learn/re-learn about this in 3 opening minutes), simian flu has wiped most of the humanity, leaving few of them stranded on the planet that used to be theirs. Unbeknownst to them, the planet isn’t bound to them anymore. After the fall of men, the ‘Rise’ of apes is the next phase and the new ‘Dawn’ of civilization embarks.

War for the Planet of the Apes begins several years after the event in Dawn, where human wages war against apes. Human military led by The Colonel (Woody Harrelson) conducts man-hunt on ape leader, Caesar (Andy Serkis). The plan gone awry, but humanity has succeeded in killing Caesar’s family and the dream of reconciliation. This event scars the peaceful ape to the extent that he’s driven into waging his war against men, hence the title.war-for-the-planet-of-the-apes-02 (1) CONTINUE READING IN ‘ENGLISH’

Okja (2017) – Review

Review: Whoever thought that Netflix and its streaming-giant comrades are not part of ‘future of the cinema’ should watch Bong Joon-ho’s (Memories of Murders, Snowpiercer) latest work, Okja—a feat endorsed by Netflix which sparked controversy in the 70th Cannes Film Festival. Joon-ho’s second international feature evidently demonstrates what would happen if an auteur is funded to make a blockbuster with full creative controls.

Working with oddball-specialist Jon Ronson (gonzo journalist who wrote the embryo of Frank and The Men Who Stare at Goat), Joon-ho crafts a prolific blockbuster to wage war against animal cruelty and capitalism of food industry in the weirdest way. Delivered in the auteur’s most original frameworkwith shades of deadpan humor and bitter satirein collaboration with Hollywood’s most versatile figures, Okja nests it all in a modest story about a superpig of the titular name. Continue reading Okja (2017) – Review

A Season with: GLOW (2017) – Season 1

Review: Netflix’ GLOW is a splendid blend of many things—from campy female wrestling, satire to telly industry, feminism spirit and rage against racial stereotypes—that work fascinatingly. Presented as a period piece which sees L.A. circa 1985, the show radicalizes the era’s fascination towards glazing neon and devotion to day-time soap opera, then mixes them together in an exhilarating, vibrant ‘fake-sport’ drama.

In GLOW, a struggling actress, Ruth Wilder (Alison Brie) is disheartened upon finding out that the industry has suppressed female roles to the brink of marginalization. When she encounters a desperate B-movie director, Sam Sylvia (Marc Maron)—who develops ‘The Gorgeous Lady of Wrestling’ a.k.a. GLOW for a TV channel, she surprisingly finds an absurdly empowering opportunity. From there, the line between pro-wrestling and soap opera begins to blur; and a road to stardom emerges. Continue reading A Season with: GLOW (2017) – Season 1