Tag Archives: Rating: 3.5

War for the Planet of the Apes (2017) – Review

Review: Let’s start with a little excerpt of what has gone so far in Planet of the Apes reboot universe. As you might have known (in fact, you’ll learn/re-learn about this in 3 opening minutes), simian flu has wiped most of the humanity, leaving few of them stranded on the planet that used to be theirs. Unbeknownst to them, the planet isn’t bound to them anymore. After the fall of men, the ‘Rise’ of apes is the next phase and the new ‘Dawn’ of civilization embarks.

War for the Planet of the Apes begins several years after the event in Dawn, where human wages war against apes. Human military led by The Colonel (Woody Harrelson) conducts man-hunt on ape leader, Caesar (Andy Serkis). The plan gone awry, but humanity has succeeded in killing Caesar’s family and the dream of reconciliation. This event scars the peaceful ape to the extent that he’s driven into waging his war against men, hence the title.war-for-the-planet-of-the-apes-02 (1) CONTINUE READING IN ‘ENGLISH’

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Okja (2017) – Review

Review: Whoever thought that Netflix and its streaming-giant comrades are not part of ‘future of the cinema’ should watch Bong Joon-ho’s (Memories of Murders, Snowpiercer) latest work, Okja—a feat endorsed by Netflix which sparked controversy in the 70th Cannes Film Festival. Joon-ho’s second international feature evidently demonstrates what would happen if an auteur is funded to make a blockbuster with full creative controls.

Working with oddball-specialist Jon Ronson (gonzo journalist who wrote the embryo of Frank and The Men Who Stare at Goat), Joon-ho crafts a prolific blockbuster to wage war against animal cruelty and capitalism of food industry in the weirdest way. Delivered in the auteur’s most original frameworkwith shades of deadpan humor and bitter satirein collaboration with Hollywood’s most versatile figures, Okja nests it all in a modest story about a superpig of the titular name. Continue reading Okja (2017) – Review

A Season with: GLOW (2017) – Season 1

Review: Netflix’ GLOW is a splendid blend of many things—from campy female wrestling, satire to telly industry, feminism spirit and rage against racial stereotypes—that work fascinatingly. Presented as a period piece which sees L.A. circa 1985, the show radicalizes the era’s fascination towards glazing neon and devotion to day-time soap opera, then mixes them together in an exhilarating, vibrant ‘fake-sport’ drama.

In GLOW, a struggling actress, Ruth Wilder (Alison Brie) is disheartened upon finding out that the industry has suppressed female roles to the brink of marginalization. When she encounters a desperate B-movie director, Sam Sylvia (Marc Maron)—who develops ‘The Gorgeous Lady of Wrestling’ a.k.a. GLOW for a TV channel, she surprisingly finds an absurdly empowering opportunity. From there, the line between pro-wrestling and soap opera begins to blur; and a road to stardom emerges. Continue reading A Season with: GLOW (2017) – Season 1

A Season with: American Gods (2017) – Season 1

Review: In adapting Neil Gaiman’s American Gods, Bryan Fuller (Hannibal) and Michael Green (Logan), take Gaiman’s vision—for a divine story about immigrants and gods in a land of no god—into a whole new level of occultism. While retaining the novel’s tongue-in-cheek philosophical relevance, the show combines it with current real-world issue—about religion and humanity—and revises the author’s neglects towards minor storylines with a more engaging, intertwined ‘war of gods’ epic.

Same as the novel, American Gods centers on Shadow Moon (Ricky Whittle), a purposeless ex-convict whose wife (Emily Browning) is killed on a car accident a few moment before his release. Upon his despair, Shadow encounters a man-god who calls himself, Wednesday (Ian McShane) and gets recruited as a henchman in war between the Old Gods (Wednesday and comrades) and the New Gods of media, technology et al. Once hired, series of enigmatic events and bands of obscure characters appears, rendering Shadow (and audience’s, too) baffled and puzzled. Yet, as Wednesday said, there’s only one rule among others: Shadow is not paid for asking questions. Continue reading A Season with: American Gods (2017) – Season 1

The Lost City of Z (2017) – Review

Review: In terms of visualizing a grandeur story about ambition, passion and destiny, James Gray’s The Lost City of Z might make handful of resemblance with Paul Thomas Anderson’s There Will Be Blood and a smaller scale of it. While the latter is a chronicle of a man’s ambition over oil field for greater goods of one’s self, the former is a spiritual adventure of a man’s ambition dividing the South American jungle to unravel humanity’s biggest secret, an older civilization hidden in the green desert.

Adapted from David Grann’s book, the quest to find Z retold the story of a British man, Percy Fawcett (Charlie Hunnam), who was tasked to map Brazil-Bolivian boundary deep in the Amazon rainforest in order to prevent wars between the two countries. Fawcett teamed up with Henry Costin (Robert Pattinson), an avid explorer of the jungle. During the tenure, Fawcett was consumed by the idea of a lost city he proposed as ‘Z’ after confirming a native’s story upon his findings of pottery. The more he believes and studies the lost city, the more he’s obsessed and the more his ambition to prove its existence emerges, engulfing his own existence.  Continue reading The Lost City of Z (2017) – Review

A Season with: Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt (2017) – Season 3

Review: Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt returns elegantly in aftermath of the second season’s ultimate cliffhanger and sees our titular powerhouse, Kimberly ‘Kimmy’ Schmidt (Ellie Kemper), grown into a more empathetically, complex protagonist. While the cult captive PTSD theme is still revisited for once or twice, season three witnesses Kimmy arises above the ground, literally leaves the underground bunker, and gets integrated into a real world problem of empowerment and feminism.

At first, Kimmy’s got to do something to clinch the cliffhanger, where Reverend Richard Wayne Gary Wayne (Jon Hamm) demands a divorce; then, she’s going to college for education and, eventually, career; later, she’s learning something about herself that makes her different from other people. At the same time, creators Tina Fey and Robert Carlock insert insightful quests for other characters to deal with, which take roots from their deeds in the second season; and make them a more integral part of the storytelling. Continue reading A Season with: Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt (2017) – Season 3