Tag Archives: Rating: 3

Life (2017) – Review

Review: The first thing Life has successfully proven is: space horror is still helluva sub-genre. While most space-themed films recently focus on breaking more grounds with cerebral sci-fi euphoria, Daniel Espinosa’s latest feature confidently takes a retro influence to remind us of that notion.

Life opens with approx. 7-minute continuous shot (that suddenly reminds me to Gravity’s opening) revolving around the space-life of 6 crew members of ISS, who at one night make the greatest breakthrough in humanity’s space voyage history: an organic evidence of extraterrestrial form in Mars. The alien being, at first, seems hazardless as a single-cell form; but, then some conditionings ‘awake’ the creature – dubbed as Calvin – to its incredible form: all cells are muscular, neural and photoreceptive – or simply, all cells are muscle, brain, and eyes at once. While the whole world is awe-struck, a noob-mistake in the space station lab triggers a butterfly effect that leads to what I’ve mentioned previously: space horror. Continue reading Life (2017) – Review

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Beauty and the Beast (2017) – Review

Review: I once wrote an abridged history of Beauty and the Beast roots on my review of Christophe Gans’ La Belle et La Bête. How this beautiful French lore has evolved, added more insight and backstories, and represented social issues from time to time alone has already made an intriguing tale. While adaptations and re-imaginings have altered it from the root, there’s one thing that never fades: the magic.

I can’t still see ‘the whys’ of Disney’s decision to remake their Renaissance animation with a live-action feature; yet, I can put aside that concerns. They’ve done it well with Cinderella (2014) by having courage and being kind and staying true to its root; and The Jungle Book (2016) by fulfilling the bare necessities. And for Beauty and the Beast, I can say that this live-action re-telling is not a must, but it’s necessary. Continue reading Beauty and the Beast (2017) – Review

A Season with: Taboo (2017)

Review: British colossus, Tom Hardy, teamed up with his Locke’s director, Steven Knight, for a period revenge-thriller, Taboo. Same as the title, the whole episode of this FX/BBC collaboration is often being too dark, too gritty, and too grim; hence, taboo.

Tom Hardy stars in this complicated 18th century London, where worlds’ biggest colonial trading companies compete. Hardy is James Delaney, a prodigal son of a wealthy man who owned a sacred land called Nootka. Presumed dead for years in aftermath of a boating accident in Africa, James returns for his father’s funeral – just in time to ruin some plans to claim the late Mr. Delaney’s land. Continue reading A Season with: Taboo (2017)

Kong: Skull Island (2017) – Review

Review: Among the most ancient colossal monsters in Western cinemas, Kong is possibly one of the most formidable. Almost always plotted out as an antihero, the giant ape has swung across films and media from 1933, most notably in King Kong (1933) and Peter Jackson’s remake in 2005. Its recent incarnation in Kong: Skull Island, however, is the biggest of all; and it’s made that way for one reason: Legendary Entertainment’s MonsterVerse – a world full of monsters, a clash of kaiju, Destroy All Monster v2.0.

Once human’s technology has advanced in the brink of Vietnam War in 1976, a mysterious island is discovered near Pacific. The island – Skull Island – immediately attracts a Monarch researcher, Will Randa (John Goodman); and as soon as there’s a possibility to reach the island, he assembles an expedition team – consisting of post-Vietnam U.S. army led by Lt. Col. Packard (Samuel L. Jackson), a group of scientists with San Lin (Jing Tian) and Brooks (Corey Hawkins) upfront, a photographer, Mason Weaver (Brie Larson) and a mercenary, James Conrad (Tom Hiddleston). Continue reading Kong: Skull Island (2017) – Review

Logan (2017) – Review

Review: Imperceptibly, it’s been 17 years since then-relatively-unknown Oz actor, Hugh Jackman, was casted as Wolverine in Bryan Singer’s X-Men. The character’s popularity among fans and Jackman’s nuanced performance have made Wolverine more popular to the extent that this character has become the backbone of X-Men cinematic universe making a trinity with Professor Xavier and Magneto.

After appearing in all X-Men films including 2 spin-offs, it’s high time Wolverine received the highest appreciation as a superhero icon: one last chance for a heart-warming farewell. Continue reading Logan (2017) – Review

BLINDSPOT: The English Patient (1996)

“Every night I cut out my heart. But in the morning it was full again,” said Count Almásy.

In the 69th Academy Awards, Anthony Minghella’s The English Patient garnered 12 nominations and won 9 of them including Best Picture and Best Director, hence this post. Minghella’s tour de force practically owns it all and is praised as the film of the year in the same year as Fargo, Jerry Maguire,Shine et al. Clocking in at 162 minutes (as it was initially reportedly to have a 250-minute cut), this epic story is clearly ambitious and tough to watch for its lengthy duration; but, it really is worth the duration. Continue reading BLINDSPOT: The English Patient (1996)