Tag Archives: Rating: 4

Blindspot: Chariots of Fire (1981)

“I believe God made me for a purpose, but he also made me fast. And when I run I feel His pleasure,” said Eric Liddell to his pious sister.

Of God and men, of faith and patriotism, for serving God and breaking stereotypes, Hugh Hudson’s Chariots of Fire wraps them all in a biopic about British athletic team’s triumphant victory in the 1924 Olympics. It’s a rare picture which concatenates the urgency of nationalism, ambition, and the evangelism on running tracks, making it one of the strongest Best Picture winners. Continue reading Blindspot: Chariots of Fire (1981)

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Dunkirk (2017) – Review

Review: In Dunkirk, Christopher Nolan reenacts a pivotal WWII moment dubbed as ‘Operation Dynamo’ a.k.a. ‘Miracle of Dunkirk’ as an epochal non-victorious, non-Americanized spectacle in only 106 minutes—making it his shortest but also most precise and concise tenure among his recent work. It might be a fact-based war film the auteur unlikely to make; yet, Dunkirk is still a Nolan epic through and through—with inventive storytelling, heartfelt tension and Nolan’s math.

It’s 1940 where approximately 400,000 allied soldiers of British Empire and France were cornered in a French beach town, Dunkirk; in a literal “between the Devil and the deep blue sea” circumstance. What separates those defenseless soldiers and home are only Nazis following from the land behind, Nazis bombing from the air above, Nazis torpedoing over the sea and the freezing 100 kilometers of sea. Rescue ships cannot reach the shore; only private boats, yachts and civilian tugboats can reach the ground. On the brink of a colossal loss, miracle only happens when home comes to those men who cannot go home. Continue reading Dunkirk (2017) – Review

A Season with: The Handmaid’s Tale (2017) – Season 1

Review: In Hulu’s adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s novel, The Handmaid’s Tale, the near-future world is depicted as a real horror show, especially for women. A theocratic totalitarian government of Gilead rises from the ashes of what once known as the United States—which has perished in aftermath of a civil war leading to environment contamination and financial crisis. In this dystopian world, stability is built upon sacrifices; but the sacrifice is too tremendous: women’s position in the society.

Gilead—a fascist regime, which lays its foundation upon Biblical inspiration, diabolically confiscates women’s right and subjugates them to the outer realm of society. Those women—who mostly become infertile due to the war—are considered low and no longer allowed to work, even read. Those who are lucky enough to still be fertile aren’t actually lucky. They are enslaved as Handmaids to be legally raped in a ceremony to conceive children for the bourgeois. Continue reading A Season with: The Handmaid’s Tale (2017) – Season 1

Blindspot: Unforgiven (1992)

“I’ve killed women and children. I’ve killed just about everything that walks or crawled at one time or another,” said William Munny explaining who he was.

Clint Eastwood dedicated his final Western film as a director and an actor, Unforgiven,  to the sub-genre that has made great name out of him. More, he specifically dedicated it to people whom he’ll be forever in debt with, Sergio Leone and Don Siegel. And, who knows that a devoted tribute would end up being a milestone to the modern-day Western film. And, who knows that this tribute would be Eastwood’s legacy. Continue reading Blindspot: Unforgiven (1992)

A Season with: Big Little Lies (2017)

Review: Welcome to Monterey, California! It’s a beautiful beachside city where first-grader public school orientation might lead to a murder on parents’ trivia night. Neither victim nor the murderer is revealed; but, when we trace a further back, there’s a series of big little lies masterminding the eventual murder. And, that’s how we start Big Little Lies.

Adapted from phenomenal novel by Australian author, Liane Moriarty, this HBO’s mini-series – written by David E. Kelley and directed in its entirety by Jean-Marc Vallée (Dallas Buyers Club, Wild) – unravels an unsettling parental drama in the light of blurry crime-mystery. Instead of ‘asking’ audiences to get invested to the murder mystery, Big Little Lies focuses more on its characters – their parental lives, their scandals, their darkest secrets and the meaning of cause and consequences – delivered with stellar performance by top-tier casts. Continue reading A Season with: Big Little Lies (2017)

Get Out (2017) – Review

Review: Jordan Peele’s directorial debut Get Out is truly a cinematic experience. How wouldn’t? It’s a witty satirical pitch-black comedy about racism served in horror or thriller mantle (depends on how you would perceive it). Furthermore, it feels mysteriously uncomfortable as it sneaks behind and takes you by surprise at every possible turn. To call it one of the most noteworthy films of the year isn’t exaggerating at all.

Before discussing further, I wouldn’t suggest you watching any trailers or reading careless synopsis; therefore, I am writing this spoiler-free review as careful and neatly as possible. Continue reading Get Out (2017) – Review