Tag Archives: Sci-Fi

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017) – Review

Review: Recapturing the magic of the original/first film is often an arduous quest, even by Marvel standards. Let’s forget not about how Joss Whedon’s misery, in crafting Age of Ultron to follow up the groundbreaking Avengers assemble, could not live up to the expectation. Given that record, it’s not a big surprise that Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 falls flat in its attempt to live up the virtuoso of Marvel’s biggest gamble; what’s surprising: it still makes an awesome fun-tertaining space bravura centering on galaxy’s most favorite dysfunctional ‘family.’

Element of surprise is what’s missed in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. The Guardians – along with their closest relatives – aren’t unfamiliar faces anymore; same goes to Awesome Mix, the intergalactic vistas, and the typical jokes and banters they’re throwing. During their tenure in Guardians of the Galaxy, they’ve shared spotlight to finally form this band of misfits into a sort of universe protectors. Now, some must relegate into supporting roles and some must go upfront in not so typical disbanding-after-assembling sequel trope. Continue reading Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017) – Review

Advertisements

A Season with: Legion (2017) – Season 1

Review: In a world where superhero TV series comes in either one of these three styles: Netflix-Marvel street-vigilante style, Marvel movie tie-in style, or DC’s over-the-top Arrowverse style, FX’s Legion is an oddball. It doesn’t follow those patterns of style; even, it feels like a non-superhero superhero story. Sure thing is, the whole first season of Legion is a kind of thing you’ve never seen before in television (or even cinemas).

Do yourself a little favor by googling about Legion’s origin and you’ll understand why Fargo series’ creator, Noah Hawley is eager to adopt this X-Men bravura under his wings. First introduced in New Mutants comic book, Legion a.k.a. David Haller (portrayed by Dan Stevens) immediately cements his position as one of the most interesting mutant – not only because his connection to someone important in X-Men ranks, but also because his ability which makes him dubbed as ‘the strongest mutant alive.’ With such a fascinating biography, this psycho-frenzy mutant definitely needs a proper introduction; yet, that is the least you can expect from a superhero’s origin story. Continue reading A Season with: Legion (2017) – Season 1

Life (2017) – Review

Review: The first thing Life has successfully proven is: space horror is still helluva sub-genre. While most space-themed films recently focus on breaking more grounds with cerebral sci-fi euphoria, Daniel Espinosa’s latest feature confidently takes a retro influence to remind us of that notion.

Life opens with approx. 7-minute continuous shot (that suddenly reminds me to Gravity’s opening) revolving around the space-life of 6 crew members of ISS, who at one night make the greatest breakthrough in humanity’s space voyage history: an organic evidence of extraterrestrial form in Mars. The alien being, at first, seems hazardless as a single-cell form; but, then some conditionings ‘awake’ the creature – dubbed as Calvin – to its incredible form: all cells are muscular, neural and photoreceptive – or simply, all cells are muscle, brain, and eyes at once. While the whole world is awe-struck, a noob-mistake in the space station lab triggers a butterfly effect that leads to what I’ve mentioned previously: space horror. Continue reading Life (2017) – Review

Power Rangers (2017) – Review

Review: To the glorified 90s kids, Mighty Morphin Power Rangers was an all-time phenomenon. Five candy-colored heroes in costume (well, sometimes six), guided by a hologram face and an android, fight fancy-designed monsters – who can morph into giant form – with mecha-assembles called zord. It’s an immortal childhood memories for those kids; and immortal money pit for the makers, hence the new Lionsgate adaptation, Power Rangers.

This new Power Rangers starts with a new invention to the Power Rangers myth where Zordon (Bryan Cranston) sacrificed himself to protect ‘Zeo crystal’ from his treacherous ex-Ranger-mate, Rita Repulsa (Elizabeth Banks). Million years later, the battleground is now a small city called – yes you’re right – Angel Grove, where five teenagers: Jason (Dacre Montgomerry, Stranger Things), Billy (RJ Cycler, Me and Earl and the Dying Girl), Kimberly (Naomi Scott), Zack (Ludi Lin) and Trini (Becky G.) reside. As predictable as ever, Power Rangers follows the ‘usual plot’; but what can you expect from a Rangers film but fun and campiness? Continue reading Power Rangers (2017) – Review

Resident Evil: The Final Chapter (2017) – Review

Review: The sixth installment of Resident Evil franchise opens with a recaps of ‘the story so far’ narrated by the protagonist, Umbrella’s prodigal daughter, Alice (Milla Jovovich). Going further to several years prior to the first film, the prologue jumps to the event in the first film, and abruptly shifts to several minutes before this Final Chapter.

At one point it’s a courtesy to help audiences refresh and brush up some worn-off memories about the plot of the whole franchise. At the same time, it confirms that, except for the first installment, Resident Evil is rather prolonged, characterless, and forgettable. The Final Chapter has the potentials to wipe that gripe off, to make a lasting final impression; but, the same thing that weighed down its predecessors weighs it down, too. Continue reading Resident Evil: The Final Chapter (2017) – Review

Arrival (2016) – Review

Review: In Arrival, 12 extraterrestrial saucers mysteriously appear and float above 12 different places around the Earth. Clueless of what they may encounter, humanity quickly falls into fears and turmoil. A linguistic professor, Dr. Louise Banks (Amy Adams) is summoned into an alien site nearby to decipher the alien’s alleged language, to prevent mass hysteria that might lead to a war of the world.

David Villeneuve, director of acclaimed grim thrillers (from Incendies to Sicario), picks up where other ‘first-contact’ predecessors (i.e., The Day the Earth Stood Still or Independence Day) have established and neutralizes it, making it more ambiguous in terms of the hazard. Arrival is presented as a new non-patronizing and non-preachy cerebral sci-fi detailing an mind-bending approach to allegedly alien invasion. Continue reading Arrival (2016) – Review