Tag Archives: Sci-Fi

Transformers: The Last Knight (2017) – Review

Review: Michael Bay’s criticproof franchise returns with another Bayhem galore—a non-stop clink-clicketty-clank-bang-boom juggernaut slugfest—in what’s dubbed as Bay’s final Transformers film, The Last Knight. The final result though—after decade with five installments so far—offers no new insight to the storyline but bunch of same day, different spectacles.

Starting off as an expanded myth of Camelot, where ancient transformers assisted King Arthur and his knights of round fighting Saxons, The Last Knight immediately leaps sixteen centuries ahead. While Optimus Prime has left the earth in search of his home-planet, Cybertron, other transformers keep coming to earth and are declared as threat; therefore, a counter-transformer task force called T.R.F is deployed to exterminate them. That’s when Cade Yeager from Age of Extinction encounters a versatile kid, Izabella (Isabella Moner) and ‘get chosen’ to partake in an ancient myth. Continue reading Transformers: The Last Knight (2017) – Review

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A Season with: The Handmaid’s Tale (2017) – Season 1

Review: In Hulu’s adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s novel, The Handmaid’s Tale, the near-future world is depicted as a real horror show, especially for women. A theocratic totalitarian government of Gilead rises from the ashes of what once known as the United States—which has perished in aftermath of a civil war leading to environment contamination and financial crisis. In this dystopian world, stability is built upon sacrifices; but the sacrifice is too tremendous: women’s position in the society.

Gilead—a fascist regime, which lays its foundation upon Biblical inspiration, diabolically confiscates women’s right and subjugates them to the outer realm of society. Those women—who mostly become infertile due to the war—are considered low and no longer allowed to work, even read. Those who are lucky enough to still be fertile aren’t actually lucky. They are enslaved as Handmaids to be legally raped in a ceremony to conceive children for the bourgeois. Continue reading A Season with: The Handmaid’s Tale (2017) – Season 1

Alien: Covenant (2017) – Review

Review: Intriguing how Alien: Covenant opens with a birth, a genesis, in a majestic all-white background contrasts with the franchise’ primal return to its origin. That birth accompanied by Wagner’s Entry of The Gods Into Valhalla is designed to bridge over two worlds – the stark, horror space of Ridley Scott’s Alien (1979) and the odd, philosophy-heavy world of Prometheus (2012) – and continue the cycle. Of gods and men, of gods and monsters, this bleak covenant is more a continuation than a return.

For the flight of Covenant, Mr. Scott amalgamates small dose of Alien’s infernal, frigid space horror with larger dose of Prometheus’ dialogue-laden, existentialism wisdom unevenly, but perfectly, to ignite nostalgia, while at the same time, connect dots. Continue reading Alien: Covenant (2017) – Review

The Circle (2017) – Review

Review: In The Circle, James Ponsoldt – a promising director with sympathetic character-driven dramas (Smashed, The Spectacular Now, and The End of the Tour) – attempts to create a Dr. Strangelove of the 21st century while substituting ‘The Bomb’ with ‘The Internet.’ Based on Dave Eggers’ 2013 novel, this is projected as a poignant satire to criticize how internet has taken over real life and, especially, threatened privacy. And yet, Ponsoldt ends up making a star-studded mess with mostly underused idea and, more, superfluous subject.

What happened was, by the time Eggers published the novel, the subject matter became highly relevant with global circumstances IN REAL TIME. Yet, one click later, three years have passed and, ironically, Eggers’ fears had some surfaced, emerged, and made real life stranger than fiction; and that’s how The Circle becomes irrelevant and, as I mentioned previously, superfluous. Continue reading The Circle (2017) – Review

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017) – Review

Review: Recapturing the magic of the original/first film is often an arduous quest, even by Marvel standards. Let’s forget not about how Joss Whedon’s misery, in crafting Age of Ultron to follow up the groundbreaking Avengers assemble, could not live up to the expectation. Given that record, it’s not a big surprise that Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 falls flat in its attempt to live up the virtuoso of Marvel’s biggest gamble; what’s surprising: it still makes an awesome fun-tertaining space bravura centering on galaxy’s most favorite dysfunctional ‘family.’

Element of surprise is what’s missed in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. The Guardians – along with their closest relatives – aren’t unfamiliar faces anymore; same goes to Awesome Mix, the intergalactic vistas, and the typical jokes and banters they’re throwing. During their tenure in Guardians of the Galaxy, they’ve shared spotlight to finally form this band of misfits into a sort of universe protectors. Now, some must relegate into supporting roles and some must go upfront in not so typical disbanding-after-assembling sequel trope. Continue reading Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017) – Review

A Season with: Legion (2017) – Season 1

Review: In a world where superhero TV series comes in either one of these three styles: Netflix-Marvel street-vigilante style, Marvel movie tie-in style, or DC’s over-the-top Arrowverse style, FX’s Legion is an oddball. It doesn’t follow those patterns of style; even, it feels like a non-superhero superhero story. Sure thing is, the whole first season of Legion is a kind of thing you’ve never seen before in television (or even cinemas).

Do yourself a little favor by googling about Legion’s origin and you’ll understand why Fargo series’ creator, Noah Hawley is eager to adopt this X-Men bravura under his wings. First introduced in New Mutants comic book, Legion a.k.a. David Haller (portrayed by Dan Stevens) immediately cements his position as one of the most interesting mutant – not only because his connection to someone important in X-Men ranks, but also because his ability which makes him dubbed as ‘the strongest mutant alive.’ With such a fascinating biography, this psycho-frenzy mutant definitely needs a proper introduction; yet, that is the least you can expect from a superhero’s origin story. Continue reading A Season with: Legion (2017) – Season 1