Silence (2016) – Review

Review: Undeniably, Silence is Martin Scorsese’s most personal and ambitious work to date. Adapting Shusaku Endo’s 1966 novel of the same title about the voyage of two Jesuit priests in the 17th century Japan, in a misty era called ‘Kakure Kirishitan’ or ‘hidden Christian.’ It is a story about faith and questions that surround men of faith in a desperate time. Inarguably, it is poignant, visceral and though-provoking at the same time – just like faith itself.

Silence follows Father Rodrigues (Andrew Garfield) and Father Garupe (Adam Driver), who voluntarily voyage from Portugal to Japan in order to locate the whereabouts of their missing mentor, Father Ferreira (Liam Neeson). Arriving in Japan, the priests immediately get plunged into the miserable life of Japanese Christians, who live and pray in silence and secrecy, for fear of being prosecuted and tortured by Shogunate Inquisitor, Inoue (Issei Ogata). Under such circumstances, the priests barely carry their initial mission out as they’re engulfed in rehabilitating the people’s deteriorating faith and survive the catastrophe themselves. Continue reading Silence (2016) – Review

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February 2017 – A Recap

February was not as prolific as imagined. Only plenty of films were released (especially in accordance to the Oscar); fortunately, most of them were great. The highlight of this month is The Academy Awards in the end of the month, which could’ve been the best of the decade, but apparently wasn’t. I’ve been crossing off some films from my Biggest Misses list, whose title is apparently correct; and put all of those films in short reviews in this recap. Surprisingly enough, none of those films really feel ‘romantic’ like how February should’ve been.

Here’s a recap to help readers catch up with what went in Sinekdoks along February 2017! Continue reading February 2017 – A Recap

BLINDSPOT: The English Patient (1996)

“Every night I cut out my heart. But in the morning it was full again,” said Count Almásy.

In the 69th Academy Awards, Anthony Minghella’s The English Patient garnered 12 nominations and won 9 of them including Best Picture and Best Director, hence this post. Minghella’s tour de force practically owns it all and is praised as the film of the year in the same year as Fargo, Jerry Maguire,Shine et al. Clocking in at 162 minutes (as it was initially reportedly to have a 250-minute cut), this epic story is clearly ambitious and tough to watch for its lengthy duration; but, it really is worth the duration. Continue reading BLINDSPOT: The English Patient (1996)

Rings (2017) – Review

Review: When Julia (Matilda Lutz) finds out that her boyfriend (Alex Roe) gets involved in the cycle of “killing videotape” of Samara Morgan from The Ring (2002), she willingly sacrifices herself by watching a copy of the videotape. While waiting for seven-day trial to end, she begins receiving strange metaphysical messages from the behind-the-video entity, which apparently has a hidden agenda for her.

The most obvious problem of Rings is: it attempts to reenact what the first Western Ring excels in. It questionably copies the repetitive cycle and add some superfluous backstory. Viewers of The Ring and sequel have already been too familiar – in other words, fed up – about it; and new viewers will find it worn-off in only 15 minutes in. Yet, what’s most problematic of it all is: it’s not scary at all. Continue reading Rings (2017) – Review

Manchester by the Sea (2016) – Review

Review: In Manchester by the Sea, writer-director Kenneth Lonergan crafts a subtle chef-d’oeuvre of tragedy, involving grief and only grief. And by mentioning ‘tragedy’, what I mean is the ancient form of drama – based on human suffering that appeals audiences’ pleasure; therefore, that doesn’t mean it is a tear-jerking melodrama, although it indeed is a bitter story. And, if Lonergan is the god of this story, this god must have laughed over the tragedy-by-tragedy that strikes its main protagonist and the surroundings.

Grief is what force-starts everything in Manchester by the Sea. There we meet our man, Lee Chandler (Casey Affleck with devotion), a handyman in Boston and a divorcee. The conspiring nature calls Lee back to his home town, a Massachusetts coast town, Manchester-by-the-Sea, following the death of his brother (Kyle Chandler). Lee is called to tend his brother’s son, Patrick (Lucas Hedges), to mend his grief. Little did we know that the same town is where all Lee’s guilt and grief started; and, now, he must console his nephew from the pain Lee himself could not overcome. Continue reading Manchester by the Sea (2016) – Review

Lion (2016) – Review

Review: Inarguably, the true event that inspires Garth Davis’ Lion is a blessing-in-disguise story. A five-year old Indian boy, Saroo (Sunny Pawar) gets lost while going away from home with his older brother. He’s stranded in Calcutta – 1,600KM away from home; survived hardships in street life, before being adopted by an Australian couple (Nicole Kidman and David Wenham), who lives in Tasmania.

Separated from his birth family and his compassionate brother, Saroo, now a Brierley (portrayed by Dev Patel), grows into a full-fledged Australian – who even forgets to speak Hindi. When hearing about Google Earth, Saroo becomes obsessed with it to trace down his memory lane in attempt to locate his home in India. Will he find his birth house after all? At this point, knowing how this story ends is moderately forgiven, because Lion isn’t about the destination, it’s about the journey. Continue reading Lion (2016) – Review

Movie reviews, ratings, and discussions by Paskalis Damar